Little Darth Vader vs. Bolt

or… the Battle of the Two Volkswagen Superbowl Spots

In one corner we have “The Force”, the 2011 Volkswagen 50-million-YouTube-views Superbowl commercial featuring a “powerless” diminutive Darth who re-gains the power of The Force with a little help from his father and a Passat.

In the other, we have this year’s Volkswagen Superbowl Spot, “The Dog Strikes Back”, starring Bolt, a St. Bernard – Australian Golden mix. A canine “biggest loser” metaphor for the return of the New Beetle.

Both entertain. Both offer a story arc of struggle and reward. Both have a surprise ending.

Does the former make the latter the better? Or does Little Darth still reign supreme?

Watch, smile and comment.

http://youtu.be/R55e-uHQna0

http://youtu.be/0-9EYFJ4Clo

Do Ideas Need Ads Anymore?

I don’t think there’s much question that the quality of a really great ad is dependent on the quality of the idea it’s built upon. Ads like DDB’s the 1960’s iconic VW “Lemon” or any of the ’90’s “Got Milk” campaign we’re memorable high concept ideas that influenced consumer behavior in the pre-Facebook, YouTube, Twitter days of advertising.

There was a time in the not-so-recent past when print truly made a difference in brand advertising. When people bought a product because because they believed it made them appear smarter, more sophisticated, or more intelligent. Not only in their own mind but to others as well. No more. When consumers of advertising messages also became the creators, a tectonic shift occurred.

The 20th century ‘analog’ idea became the flexible, agile, stretchable, shareable ‘digital’ idea of 2011. One that doesn’t rely on ads anymore. One that doesn’t fight with competing brands for the consumer’s attention. Not anymore.

Today, ad ideas battle against every other message out there that people see, hear or read. Slugging it out against more than just advertising messages. Trying to get noticed above all the other bits of information, from RSS feeds to  blog posts to Facebook walls to a countless stream of text messages.

The thought that I’ve wrestled with in the past few days is this: “Have ads, as brand building blocks, finally become irrelevant and unnecessary?”

In a word, probably. Much as I still love creating them, (I really do) they’ve sadly become the Jimmy Carter of media… aging (not very gracefully), occasionally attracting some attention, but for the most part, they’re irrelevant and unnecessary.

Here’s proof. Name a print campaign that made you want to buy the product without going online first.

Don’t misunderstand me. I like nothing better than to gaze upon a two-page print ad with a killer concept, pithy on-point copywriting and art directed to the nines. But the times they are a changin’…  too fast, maybe. Tick, tick, tick. Waiting three weeks for the next copy of Wired to get a new print blast of brand personality just doesn’t cut it in today’s 24-hour, spin-dry, news cycle world.

So just give me ideas. Lots of them. And keep ’em coming. Ones that solve problems. That satisfy a need or desire. Hopefully the ones I have. In any media. Any time. Every day.

I recently read that match.com created 100 commercials this past year. Talk about speed dating!

So content isn’t just king. It’s King Kong!

But I for one am glad. Really glad. Because for us idea junkies, well, we’ve become more relevant and valuable than ever before.

Battle of the Brands: Part 9

Another car competition.

VW New Beetle vs Mini Cooper

Round vs Boxy

Germany vs England (via BMW)

Fun vs Fun

Individuality vs Individuality

Cult vs cult

Simple selection vs limitless options

Turbocharged vs Supercharged

Turn the key. Pedal to the metal. Smile.

FULL DISCLOSURE: I am the former owner of an “Alien Green” Turbo New Beetle and currently drive a British Racing Green Mini Cooper S

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BnAhv26AEBw

Thinking outside the box that isn’t there.

I recently was discussing a creative project with someone who remarked to me that they had a hard time “Thinking outside the box.”

Ahhhhhhhhhhhhh, that old cliche. The one that describes the land beyond those four little cardboard walls. The place where incredible, unforgettable ideas float gently across our minds like so many puffy clouds on a sunny spring day.

Which brings me to the point f this post.

Who came up with this box? What’s in the box? What’s outside the box? And, what makes the inside of the box such a bad place for ideas, and outside the box such a great place?

Frankly, I don’t believe there’s a box. Or a tooth fairy. Or a pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. Or……

You fill in the next one.

I’ve seen “outside the box” thinking that couldn’t sell ski gloves in Alaska in January. Great idea? Sure. Make me want to buy the product. No way.

And, I’ve seen a supposed “inside the box” idea drives sales off the charts. No Gold Lion Winner to be sure. But a solid, creative concept that made me want the product, get up off the couch, and part with some hard earned money. Mission accomplished.

The point is, that whatever the idea, it had better connect with the viewer and drive home some positive, motivating thought. Great ideas that are funny, entertaining and well executed but fail to deliver a relevant differentiating brand message are just that. These messages still have to solve a problem in some way. And, the problem doesn’t have to be a big one. Often the small conquest of a problem can have the most impact… if the idea that solves it is a big one.

Porsche makes some of the most wicked fast sports cars in the world. They built their brand on speed and the adrenaline rush that results. Find a curve in the road, drive fast. Find a straight stretch of road, drive wicked fast. Then, they build the Cayenne. An SUV. With all the Explorers and Grand Cherokees already out there on the road, and selling for a LOT less money, what problem were they hoping to solve?

Remember, there’s no box. Really. There’s just ideas. Big ones and little ones. Smart one and dumb ones. Ones that entertain and ones that really sell. Ones that make people like a brand and ones that make people buy.

There’s just a place in our minds where ideas come from that we have to discover. Over and over and over and over and…

Let’s all go there.

Got Gecko?

I know, it’s a bad reference to the iconic Milk Processing Board of California slogan, “Got Milk?’, but the long-running Geico campaign has become just as well known and in some ways even more successful. The Gecko’s most recent campaign ad has his “boss” turning him into a media-star meets trade-show-giveaway. Have they run out of creative ideas for the little green guy named… ?

This is just one of many television campaigns that the number 3 car insurer has run over the years. Some were very good. Others, not so much. Which one gets a gold star and which one is a bust?  All can be viewed… where else… on YouTube. But you knew that already.